Tag Archives: Prehistoric Boundaries

Let’s go fly a kite…

Over the summer there have been a few days in Wharfedale with just the right amount of wind to lift a kite without ripping it to shreds. And on some of those, I have managed to get out and about and take some more pictures with the camera rig that the lovely John Wells at West Lothian Archaeology has provided. These images are still somewhat experimental, but some of the results are here – the individual pictures have been stitched together by hand using ArcGIS in order to get a feel of the surface archaeology with more detail than is visible on aerial photographs taken from a higher level. The problem still remains, however, that the field systems are whole landscapes rather than individual sites and as such are difficult to photograph satisfactorily ‘in one go’.

Prehistoric enclosures below the scree of the scar line at Conistone (north is down).

Prehistoric enclosures below the scree of the scar line at Conistone (north is down).

Prehistoric enclosures and field boundaries below the scar line at Conistone (north is up). Some of the coaxial boundaries are visible on the bottom left and far right of the image.

Prehistoric enclosures and field boundaries below the scar line at Conistone (north is up). Some of the coaxial boundaries are visible on the bottom left and far right of the image.

Scar line (bottom) and limestone pavement at Conistone. A couple of the coaxial boundaries are visible continuing over the scar towards the pavement - the fact that boundaries continue across the pavement suggests it was originally vegetation-covered and has since been subject to processes of erosion.

Scar line (bottom) and limestone pavement at Conistone. A couple of the coaxial boundaries are visible continuing over the scar towards the pavement – the fact that boundaries continue across the pavement suggests it was originally vegetation-covered and has since been subject to processes of erosion.